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Unicondylar Knee Arthroplasty in the U.S. Patient Population: Prevalence and Epidemiology.

Publications on the prevalence of unicompartmental knee arthroplasty in the United States using a single database may have underestimated the "true" number of cases performed, given that several unicondylar knee arthroplasty (UKA) patients are <65 years and have private insurance. The prevalence of UKA in elderly (≥65 years) and younger (<65 years) populations was evaluated using the 2002 to 2011 5% sample of the Medicare data (Part B) and the 2004 to June 2012 MarketScan Commercial and Medicare Supplemental databases, respectively. The prevalence of UKA was stratified by age, gender, census region, Charlson comorbidity index, Medicare buy-in status, and diagnosis. The annual rate of change in the UKA rate was examined using Poisson regression to evaluate temporal changes considering year as a covariate. A total of 5235 and 23,310 UKA procedures were identified from the 5% Medicare and MarketScan databases, respectively. The rates of UKA generally increased until 2008, after which there was a decline. In both cohorts, gender and year of operation were found to be significantly associated with UKA rate. Analysis of data obtained over the past few years revealed that males 55 to 64 years, 65 to 69 years, and 70 to 74 years were the only age-gender groups whose UKA rates appeared to be trending upward. From 2002 to 2011, the rate of UKAs performed in the United States has increased, and a significant proportion of the surgeries were performed in younger (<65 years) patients.

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