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Trends in Utilization of Total Hip Arthroplasty for Femoral Neck Fractures in the United States.

The ideal mode of fixation for patients with femoral neck fractures is not well defined in the current literature. This study describes the recent trends in surgical management of femoral neck fractures with an analysis on perioperative outcomes. The National Hospital Discharge Survey was used to identify femoral neck fractures in the United States between 1990 and 2007 (n = 1,155,960) treated with open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF), total hip arthroplasty (THA), or hemiarthroplasty (HA). Trends were examined over the following 3 time periods: 1990 to 1995 (group 1), 1996 to 2001 (group 2), and 2002 to 2007 (group 3). Elixhauser Comorbidity Index and perioperative complications were calculated. Use of HA increased (74.4% to 84.6%), whereas that of THA (7.3% to 4.9%) and ORIF (18.3% to 10.6%) decreased, from group 1 to group 3 in the age group of >80 years. The use of ORIF increased (63.9% to 81.4%), whereas the use of both HA and THA decreased, from group 1 to group 3 in the age group of <50 years. The rate of adverse events increased across all fixation types but was greatest among THA (32.2% to 48.3%). The femoral neck patient population is now older and has more medical comorbidities. We observed a trend toward performing HA in older patients and ORIF in younger patients. Despite superior functional outcomes reported in THA, this study found a decreased utilization of THA in all age groups along with an increase in adverse events and nonroutine discharges for patients with femoral neck fractures treated with THA.

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