JOURNAL ARTICLE
MULTICENTER STUDY
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

MRI utilization during the diagnostic and post-diagnostic phases in multiple sclerosis.

BACKGROUND: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) plays an important role in the diagnosis and monitoring of people with multiple sclerosis (MS). MRI rates in MS populations are poorly understood. Although Canada has universal health care, socioeconomic status (SES) is associated with MRI use. It is unknown if such disparities persist for specific conditions such as MS when care is managed centrally, or how disease-specific characteristics may affect MRI use.

OBJECTIVE: To assess magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) use in MS and control participants and its association with participant characteristics.

METHODS: Using administrative and clinical data from Manitoba, Canada, we assessed MRI use in MS and control participants during the five years pre-index (first demyelinating claim in the administrative cohort or symptom onset in the clinical cohort), between index and diagnosis (third demyelinating claim in the administrative cohort or diagnosis date in the clinical cohort), and the five years post-diagnosis. Using zero-inflated Poisson regression, we assessed associations between participant characteristics and index year, and MRI use during these three phases.

RESULTS: We included 2,763 MS cases and 13,815 controls in the administrative cohort, and 961 MS cases in the clinical cohort. MRI use increased over time, but more in cases than in controls. Pre-index, individuals aged <50 years at the index date had lower MRI rates than those aged ≥50 years. Sex, socioeconomic status and region were not associated with MRI use. Disease-modifying therapy use was associated with 25% more MRIs post-diagnosis (adjusted rate ratio: 1.25; 95%CI:1.09-1.43) in the clinical cohort.

CONCLUSION: Our findings suggest equity of access to MRI across sex, region and socioeconomic status in MS.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app