CASE REPORTS
JOURNAL ARTICLE
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Treatment of Simultaneous Thromboembolism of the Right and Left Coronary Arteries with Thrombus Aspiration in a Patient with a Prosthetic Mitral Valve.

Prosthetic heart valve thrombosis is a rare, difficult-to-treat condition that increases morbidity and mortality by leading to systemic embolism. Clinically, it presents mainly in the form of stroke, though an embolism be observed in many systems. Acute coronary syndrome, which is rarely observed in patients with a prosthetic heart valve, mostly occurs as non-ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (MI). There is no specific recommendation for the treatment of this condition. Revascularization success rates have been shown to be variable in cases wherein thrombolytic therapy, balloon angioplasty, stent implantation, and a combination of all of these techniques are used. Herein are presented details of the successful revascularization of a patient with ST segment elevation MI presenting with simultaneous right and left coronary system embolism, and without embolism in any other system. In cases of acute coronary syndrome in patients with a prosthetic heart valve with no known coronary artery disease, starting the procedure with thrombus aspiration may prevent unnecessary stent and balloon angioplasty procedures being required, by accelerating the revascularization process.

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