JOURNAL ARTICLE

A Decade of Improvement in Door-to-Needle Time Among Acute Ischemic Stroke Patients, 2008 to 2017

Xin Tong, Jennifer L Wiltz, Mary G George, Erika C Odom, Sallyann M Coleman King, Tiffany Chang, Xiaoping Yin, Robert K Merritt
Circulation. Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes 2018, 11 (12): e004981
30557047

BACKGROUND: The clinical benefit of intravenous (IV) alteplase in acute ischemic stroke is time dependent. We assessed the overall temporal changes in door-to-needle (DTN) time and examine the factors associated with DTN time ≤60 and ≤45 minutes.

METHODS AND RESULTS: A total of 496 336 acute ischemic stroke admissions were identified in the Paul Coverdell National Acute Stroke Program from 2008 to 2017. We used generalized estimating equations models to examine the factors associated with DTN time ≤60 and ≤45 minutes, and calculated adjusted odds ratios and 95% CI. Between 2008 and 2017, the percentage of acute ischemic stroke patients who received IV alteplase including those transferred, increased from 6.4% to 15.3%. After excluding those who received IV alteplase at an outside hospital, a total of 39 737 (8%) acute ischemic stroke patients received IV alteplase within 4.5 hours of the time the patient last known to be well. Significant increases were seen in DTN time ≤60 minutes (26.4% in 2008 to 66.2% in 2017, P<0.001), as well as DTN time ≤45 minutes (10.7% in 2008 to 40.5% in 2017, P<0.001). Patients aged 55 to 84 years were more likely to receive IV alteplase within 60 minutes, while those aged 55 to 74 years were more likely to receive IV alteplase within 45 minutes, as compared with those aged 18 to 54 years. Arrival by emergency medical service, and patients with severe stroke were more likely to receive IV alteplase within 60 and 45 minutes. Conversely, women, black patients as compared with white, and patients with a medical history of diseases associated with stroke were less likely to receive DTN time ≤60 or 45 minutes.

CONCLUSIONS: Rapid improvements in DTN time were observed in the Paul Coverdell National Acute Stroke Program; however, opportunities to reduce disparities remain.

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