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The PASTA Bridge--A Repair Technique for Partial Articular-Sided Rotator Cuff Tears: A Biomechanical Evaluation of Construct Strength.

Partial articular-sided supraspinatus tendon avulsion (PASTA) tears are a common clinical problem that can require surgical intervention to reduce patient symptoms. Currently, no consensus has been reached regarding the optimal repair technique. The PASTA Bridge technique was developed by the senior author to address these types of lesions. A controlled laboratory study was performed comparing the PASTA Bridge with a standard transtendon rotator cuff repair to confirm its biomechanical efficacy. A 50% articular-sided partial tear of the supraspinatus tendon was created on 6 matched pairs of fresh-frozen cadaveric shoulders. For each matched pair, 1 humerus received a PASTA Bridge repair, whereas the contralateral side received a repair using a single suture anchor with a horizontal mattress suture. The ultimate load, yield load, and stiffness were determined from the load-displacement results for each sample. Video tracking software was used to determine the cyclic displacement of each sample at the articular margin and the repair site. Strain at the margin and repair site was then calculated using this collected data. There were no significant differences between the 2 repairs in ultimate load (P = .577), strain at the repair site (P = .355), or strain at the margin (P = .801). No instance of failure was due to the PASTA Bridge construct itself. The results of this study have established that the PASTA Bridge is biomechanically equivalent to the transtendon repair technique. The PASTA Bridge is technically easy, percutaneous, reproducible, and is associated with fewer risks.

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