Journal Article
Meta-Analysis
Systematic Review
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Is It Necessary to Perform the Pharmacological Interventions for Intrahepatic Cholestasis of Pregnancy? A Bayesian Network Meta-Analysis.

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Although many meta-analyses have evaluated the pharmacotherapy of intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy (ICP) and recommended ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) as an effective treatment, the defect of the pair-wise analyses and the mixture of the control group made the outcome uncertain and unclear. We aimed to employ Bayesian network meta-analysis (NMA) to compare the maternal and fetal outcomes after UDCA, S-adenosylmethionine (SAMe) mono-therapy or the combination treatment of these two drugs for ICP patients.

METHODS: Multiple electronic database searches were conducted for articles published up to 1 September 2018. The relevant information was extracted from the published reports with a predefined data extraction sheet, and the risk of bias was assessed with the Cochrane risk-of-bias tool. Poisson Bayesian network meta-analysis was employed to identify the synthesized evidence from the relevant trials, with reporting hazard risks (HRs) and 95% credible intervals (CrIs).

RESULTS: The pooled outcomes of the 13 randomized controlled trials (RCTs) with 625 participants indicated that none of the three regimens can significantly improve maternal and fetal outcomes.

CONCLUSION: This NMA of the RCTs clarified that the current intervention has no favorable effect on pruritus and other symptoms in ICP patients.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app