JOURNAL ARTICLE
MULTICENTER STUDY
OBSERVATIONAL STUDY
RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Coexistence of plantar calcaneal spurs and plantar fascial thickening in individuals with plantar heel pain.

Rheumatology 2019 Februrary 2
OBJECTIVES: To examine associations between plantar calcaneal spurs, plantar fascia thickening and plantar heel pain (PHP), and to determine whether tenderness on palpation of the heel differentiates between these presentations.

METHODS: Adults aged ⩾50 years registered with four general practices were mailed a Health Survey. Responders reporting foot pain within the last 12 months underwent a detailed clinical assessment. PHP in the past month was documented using a foot manikin. Plantar calcaneal spurs were identified from weight-bearing lateral radiographs and plantar fascia thickening (defined as >4 mm) from ultrasound. Tenderness on palpation of the plantar fascia insertion was documented. Associations between these factors and PHP were explored using generalized estimating equations.

RESULTS: Clinical and radiographic data were available from 530 participants (296 women, mean [s.d.] age 64.9 [8.4] years), 117 (22.1%) of whom reported PHP. Plantar calcaneal spurs and plantar fascia thickening were identified in 281 (26.5%) and 501 (47.3%) feet, respectively, but frequently coexisted (n = 217, 20.4%). Isolated plantar calcaneal spurs were rare (n = 64, 6.0%). Participants with PHP were more likely to have a combination of these features compared with those without PHP (odds ratio 2.16, 95% CI 1.24, 3.77, P = 0.007). Tenderness on palpation of the heel was not associated with plantar calcaneal spurs or plantar fascia thickening, either in isolation or in combination, in those with PHP.

CONCLUSION: Plantar calcaneal spurs and plantar fascial thickening are associated with PHP, but frequently coexist. Tenderness on palpation of the heel does not appear to differentiate between clinical presentations of PHP.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app