Journal Article
Review
Systematic Review
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The incidence of stoma related morbidity - a systematic review of randomised controlled trials.

Introduction Several stoma related complications can occur following ileostomy or colostomy formation. The reported incidence of these conditions varies widely in the literature. A systematic review of randomised controlled trials reporting the incidence of stoma related complications in adults was performed to provide the most comprehensive summary of existing data. Methods PubMed, CINAHL® (Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature) and the Cochrane Library were searched for trials assessing the incidence of complications in adults undergoing conventional stoma formation. Data were extracted by two independent reviewers and entered into SPSS® for statistical analysis. The Cochrane Collaboration tool for assessing risk of bias was used to critically appraise each study. Cochran's Q statistic and the I2 statistic were used to measure the level of heterogeneity between studies. Results Overall, 18 trials were included, involving 1,009 patients. The incidence of stoma related complications ranged from 2.9% to 81.1%. Peristomal skin complications and parastomal hernia were the most common complications. End colostomy had the highest incidence of morbidity, followed by loop colostomy and loop ileostomy. There were no trials involving patients with end ileostomy. There was a high level of detection bias and heterogeneity between studies. Conclusions This systematic review has summarised the best available evidence concerning the incidence of stoma related morbidity. The high level of heterogeneity between studies has limited the accuracy with which the true incidence of each stoma related complication can be reported. Large, multicentre trials investigating homogenous participant populations are therefore required.

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