Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Use of an Elastomeric Knee Brace in Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome: Short-Term Results.

Joints 2018 June
Purpose  This article verifies the effectiveness of a new brace on patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS) in adjunct to a specifically developed rehabilitation program. Methods  Two groups of 30 patients with PFPS were prospectively and randomly allocated to a rehabilitation protocol, with (group A) or without (group B) the use of a specific brace. All the patients were assessed at 3, 6, and 12 months using the disease-specific Kujala scale and a visual analog scale (VAS) for pain; time to return to sport and patient satisfaction with the brace were also recorded. Results  Kujala scale's values showed constant and progressive improvement. The mean score at 6 months was 79.8 ± 6.8 points in group A and 76.8 ± 8.6 in group B, rising at 12 months to 80.9 ± 7.5 in group A and 78.4 ± 8.3 in group B. VAS scores significantly differed ( p  < 0.05) between the two groups at both 6 and 12 months; the score recorded at 12 months was 0.9 ± 1.3 in the brace-treated group and 1.8 ± 1.6 in the controls. The patients who used a brace showed a quicker return to sports and 75% of the patients in this group were satisfied. Conclusion  All the scores improved progressively in both groups. The most significant improvement concerned pain, showing that the brace used in this study may allow a better subjective outcome and a quicker return to sport. Level of Evidence  Level II, prospective randomized controlled trial.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app