JOURNAL ARTICLE

Prenatally diagnosed congenital lung malformations-A long-term outcome study

Andrea J Thompson, Emma L Sidebotham, Philip A J Chetcuti, David C G Crabbe
Pediatric Pulmonology 2018, 53 (10): 1442-1446
30009482

AIM: To report the natural history of a cohort of children with prenatally diagnosed congenital lung malformations (CLM) which we set out to manage expectantly.

METHODS: Retrospective review of children born between 1995 and 2013 with a CLM identified on prenatal ultrasound. Prenatal ultrasound data were analyzed along with patient medical records, radiology, and pathology.

RESULTS: One hundred fifty-nine newborns with a fetal lung lesion were identified during the study period. All infants were live born. Twenty-eight (18%) newborns were symptomatic, 17 with transient symptoms, and 11 with persistent symptoms. The latter all underwent lobectomy in the neonatal period with two postoperative deaths. One hundred thirty-one asymptomatic newborns plus the 17 babies with transient symptoms (148 total) were followed during childhood for a median of 6.0 years (0.1-19.2 years). Twenty-one children (13% of the original cohort of 159) became symptomatic at a median age of 2.5 years (9 months-5 years 8 months) with infection and underwent CLM resection. No child became symptomatic after the age of 5 years 8 months. One hundred twenty-seven children remained symptom free during follow-up for a median of 5.75 years (1 month-19 years). We saw no instance of malignancy in the resected specimens.

CONCLUSIONS: This study adds further evidence that most children born with CLM identified prenatally are asymptomatic at birth and the majority will remain asymptomatic during childhood. We recommend follow-up to the age of 10 years.

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