JOURNAL ARTICLE
RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
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Sites of distant metastases and overall survival in ovarian cancer: A study of 1481 patients.

Gynecologic Oncology 2018 September
OBJECTIVE: To assess the association between patterns of distant metastases and overall survival in metastatic ovarian cancer and identify prognostic factors for site-specific distant metastases.

METHODS: Data was obtained from the SEER database between 2010 and 2014. Univariate and multivariate Cox proportional hazard models were used to identify variables associated with overall survival. Survival times between different groups were compared using Kaplan-Meier analysis and log-rank tests.

RESULTS: We analyzed 1481 patients. The most common distant metastatic site was liver, followed by distant lymph nodes, lung, bone, and brain. The site of distant metastases was an independent prognostic factor for overall survival. Using liver metastases as reference, overall survival was lower for lung metastases (p = 0.0297) and higher for distant lymph node metastases (p = 0.0006). Using distant lymph nodes as reference, distant metastases to the liver (p = 0.0006), lung (p < 0.0001), brain (p = 0.0455), and bone (p = 0.0138) were all associated with worse overall survival. The number of metastatic sites did not affect overall survival. We also found that surgery and chemotherapy affected overall survival for patients with distant lymph node metastases only; age, histological subtype, surgery, and chemotherapy affected overall survival for patients with liver metastases only, while histological subtype and chemotherapy affected overall survival for patients with lung metastases only.

CONCLUSIONS: The site of distant metastases affected overall survival in metastatic ovarian cancer. Patients with specific distant metastatic sites should receive special treatment and management. The identified prognostic factors can help clinician evaluate the prognosis for ovarian cancer patients with distant metastases.

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