JOURNAL ARTICLE
OBSERVATIONAL STUDY
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How Does Smoking Cessation Affect Disease Activity, Function Loss, and Quality of Life in Smokers With Ankylosing Spondylitis?

BACKGROUND: Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a chronic systemic inflammatory disease that can progressively restrict spinal mobility.

OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to investigate how smoking cessation by AS patients affects disease activity and their psychological state, physical mobility, lung function, and quality of life.

MATERIALS AND METHODS: This was a longitudinal, single-blind, controlled, and observational study on 92 AS patients. Pulmonary function test, Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI), Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index, Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Metrology Index, chest expansion, Short-Form 36, and Ankylosing Spondylitis Quality of Life were evaluated. The patients were divided into smokers (group 1 = 54) and nonsmokers (group 2 = 38). The smokers were divided further into subgroups of those who quit smoking (group 1a = 17) and those who did not (group 1b = 37). Groups 1a and 1b patients were compared in terms of their baseline data and data 6 months after smoking cessation. In addition, group 1a patients' baseline data and data 6 months after smoking cessation were compared statistically.

RESULTS: There was no statistically significant difference between groups 1a and 1b after 6 months in terms of the evaluated parameters, except for BASDAI. Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index was significantly lower in group 1a than group 1b (p = 0.02), indicating that. When the baseline data and data after 6 months of group 1a were compared, a significant improvement was found in BASDAI (p = 0.001), Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index (p = 0.001), chest expansion (p = 0.001), ankylosing spondylitis quality of life (p = 0.003), and subparameters physical function (p = 0.015), physical role strength (p = 0.05), power/live/vitality (p = 0.025), social functioning (p = 0.039), pain (p = 0.036), and general health perception (p = 0.05) of Short-Form 36, as well as forced expiratory volume in the first second (p = 0.003) and forced vital capacity (p = 0.007).

CONCLUSIONS: We observed significant improvements in disease activity, physical mobility, and quality of life in AS patients who quit smoking.

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