RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Safety and efficacy of topical cantharidin for the treatment of pediatric molluscum contagiosum: a prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled pilot trial.

Topical cantharidin is a commonly used treatment for molluscum contagiosum (MC). However, studies validating its safety and efficacy are limited. We conducted a 6-week, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial with subsequent open-label extension to assess the safety and effectiveness of cantharidin in treating pediatric MC. Ninety-four participants with MC were randomized to receive cantharidin or placebo, with or without occlusion. The primary outcome was complete lesion clearance. Secondary outcomes included post-treatment lesion count, adverse events, and side effects. No significant differences between the study arms, including baseline lesion count, were observed. The overall mean (SD) baseline lesion count was 22.2 (12.9). The number of participants achieving total clearance is as follows: 7/23 (30.4%) in the cantharidin only arm, 10/24 (41.7%) in the cantharidin with occlusion arm, 2/25 (8.0%) in the placebo with occlusion arm, and 3/22 (13.6%) in the placebo only arm. Post hoc analysis demonstrated that 17/47 (36.2%) participants in the combined cantharidin arms achieved clearance compared to 5/47 (10.6%) in the placebo arms (P = 0.0065). The mean (SD) lesion count change from baseline was -5.1 (12.2) in the placebo only arm; the mean change (SD) was -17.4 (12.8) in the cantharidin only arm (P = 0.0033) and -15.9 (11.6) in the cantharidin with occlusion arm (P = 0.0101). No serious adverse events or side effects were observed. Topical cantharidin was well-tolerated and associated with the resolution of MC.

Full text links

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Group 7SearchHeart failure treatmentPapersTopicsCollectionsEffects of Sodium-Glucose Cotransporter 2 Inhibitors for the Treatment of Patients With Heart Failure Importance: Only 1 class of glucose-lowering agents-sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors-has been reported to decrease the risk of cardiovascular events primarily by reducingSeptember 1, 2017: JAMA CardiologyAssociations of albuminuria in patients with chronic heart failure: findings in the ALiskiren Observation of heart Failure Treatment study.CONCLUSIONS: Increased UACR is common in patients with heart failure, including non-diabetics. Urinary albumin creatininineJul, 2011: European Journal of Heart FailureRandomized Controlled TrialEffects of Liraglutide on Clinical Stability Among Patients With Advanced Heart Failure and Reduced Ejection Fraction: A Randomized Clinical Trial.Review

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Read by QxMD is copyright © 2021 QxMD Software Inc. All rights reserved. By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app