JOURNAL ARTICLE

Blockade of the C5a-C5aR axis alleviates lung damage in hDPP4-transgenic mice infected with MERS-CoV

Yuting Jiang, Guangyu Zhao, Nianping Song, Pei Li, Yuehong Chen, Yan Guo, Junfeng Li, Lanying Du, Shibo Jiang, Renfeng Guo, Shihui Sun, Yusen Zhou
Emerging Microbes & Infections 2018 April 24, 7 (1): 77
29691378
The pathogenesis of highly pathogenic Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) remains poorly understood. In a previous study, we established an hDPP4-transgenic (hDPP4-Tg) mouse model in which MERS-CoV infection causes severe acute respiratory failure and high mortality accompanied by an elevated secretion of cytokines and chemokines. Since excessive complement activation is an important factor that contributes to acute lung injury after viral infection, in this study, we investigated the role of complement in MERS-CoV-induced lung damage. Our study showed that complement was excessively activated in MERS-CoV-infected hDPP4-Tg mice through observations of increased concentrations of the C5a and C5b-9 complement activation products in sera and lung tissues, respectively. Interestingly, blocking C5a production by targeting its receptor, C5aR, alleviated lung and spleen tissue damage and reduced inflammatory responses. More importantly, anti-C5aR antibody treatment led to decreased viral replication in lung tissues. Furthermore, compared with the sham treatment control, apoptosis of splenic cells was less pronounced in the splenic white pulp of treated mice, and greater number of proliferating splenic cells, particularly in the red pulp, was observed. These data indicate that (1) dysregulated host immune responses contribute to the severe outcome of MERS; (2) excessive complement activation, triggered by MERS-CoV infection, promote such dysregulation; and (3) blockade of the C5a-C5aR axis lead to the decreased tissue damage induced by MERS-CoV infection, as manifested by reduced apoptosis and T cell regeneration in the spleen. Therefore, the results of this study suggest a new strategy for clinical intervention and adjunctive treatment in MERS-CoV cases.

Full Text Links

Find Full Text Links for this Article

Discussion

You are not logged in. Sign Up or Log In to join the discussion.

Trending Papers

Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
29691378
×

Save your favorite articles in one place with a free QxMD account.

×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"