JOURNAL ARTICLE
RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
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Acute coronary syndrome: Relationship between genetic variants and TIMI risk.

Cytokine 2018 October
Acute Coronary Syndrome (ACS) is a multifactorial disease, including the genetic factor, caused by coronary artery obstruction by atheroma. Some genetic variants have been described as risk factors for this disease. Its early diagnosis and stratification of risk of death by Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction (TIMI) are important. Therefore, we evaluated variants in the IL6R (c950-1722C>T), TNFa (c.-488G>A), LEPR (c.2673+1118C>T) and IL1b (c.-598T>C) genes in relation to TIMI risk, cytokine serum levels, and risk factors for ACS. We selected 200 patients with ACS, 50 without ACS from the Real Hospital Português, Recife - PE, and 295 blood donors at the Fundação de Hematologia e Hemoterapia de Pernambuco (Hemope). Variants were determined by DNA sequencing or enzymatic cleavage. Cytokine levels were measured by ELISA. The most frequent risk factors found in the patients were dyslipidemia and hypertension, this latter associated with high TIMI risk (p = 0.003). Genotype frequencies of IL6R and TNFa differed between patients with ACS and the blood donors (p = 0.0002 and p = 0.01, respectively), and TNF-α levels differed between genotypes. The TT genotype of the IL6R gene is as a possible protective factor for ACS because it was significantly more present in blood donors (32.2%) than in patients with ACS (18.0%), and was more frequent in low TIMI risk (22.9%) than in the intermediate (20.2%) or high (4.9%). In patients with ACS, the TT genotype in IL6R was related to a lower concentration of c-reactive protein (p = 0.03) and troponin (p = 0.02), showing a less inflammatory reaction and tissue damage. The differences in the frequencies of variants in genes of medical interest among the groups show the importance of studies in specific populations groups to establish the relationship between genes and diseases.

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