Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Steroid administration after anaesthetic induction with etomidate does not reduce in-hospital mortality or cardiovascular morbidity after non-cardiac surgery.

BACKGROUND: We tested the primary hypothesis that corticosteroid administration after etomidate exposure reduces a composite of in-hospital mortality and cardiovascular morbidity after non-cardiac surgery.

METHODS: We evaluated ASA physical status III and IV patients who had non-cardiac surgery with general anaesthesia at the Cleveland Clinic. Amongst 4275 patients in whom anaesthesia was induced with etomidate, 804 were also given steroid intraoperatively, mostly dexamethasone at a median dose of 6 mg. We successfully matched 582 steroid patients with 1023 non-steroid patients. The matched groups were compared on composite of in-hospital mortality and cardiovascular morbidity using a generalized-estimating-equation model. Secondly, the matched groups were compared on length of hospital stay using a Cox proportional hazard model, and were descriptively compared on intraoperative blood pressures using a standardized difference.

RESULTS: There was no significant association between intraoperative steroid administration after anaesthetic induction with etomidate and the composite of in-hospital mortality or cardiovascular morbidity; the estimated common odds ratio across the two components of the composite was 0.86 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.64, 1.16] for steroid vs non-steroid, P=0.33. The duration of postoperative hospitalisation was significantly shorter amongst steroid patients [median (Q1, Q3): 6 (3, 10) days] than non-steroid patients [7 (4, 11) days], with an estimated hazard ratio of 0.89 (0.80, 0.98) for steroid vs non-steroid, P=0.01. Intraoperative blood pressures were similar in steroid and non-steroid patients.

CONCLUSIONS: Steroid administration after induction of anaesthesia with etomidate did not reduce mortality or cardiovascular morbidity.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app