Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
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Gene Therapy for Adenosine Deaminase Deficiency: A Comprehensive Evaluation of Short- and Medium-Term Safety.

Molecular Therapy 2018 March 8
Loss of adenosine deaminase activity leads to severe combined immunodeficiency (ADA-SCID); production and function of T, B, and natural killer (NK) cells are impaired. Gene therapy (GT) with an autologous CD34+ -enriched cell fraction that contains CD34+ cells transduced with a retroviral vector encoding the human ADA cDNA sequence leads to immune reconstitution in most patients. Here, we report short- and medium-term safety analyses from 18 patients enrolled as part of single-arm, open-label studies or compassionate use programs. Survival was 100% with a median of 6.9 years follow-up (range, 2.3 to 13.4 years). Adverse events were mostly grade 1 or grade 2 and were reported by all 18 patients following GT. Thirty-nine serious adverse events (SAEs) were reported by 15 of 18 patients; no SAEs were considered related to GT. The most common adverse events reported post-GT include upper respiratory tract infection, gastroenteritis, rhinitis, bronchitis, oral candidiasis, cough, neutropenia, diarrhea, and pyrexia. Incidence rates for all of these events were highest during pre-treatment, treatment, and/or 3-month follow-up and then declined over medium-term follow-up. GT did not impact the incidence of neurologic/hearing impairments. No event indicative of leukemic transformation was reported.

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