JOURNAL ARTICLE
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Cyanosis and Stroke due to Functional Cor Triatriatum Dexter in a Neonate.

Small remnants of the right valve of the sinus venosus are commonly found in adults, but the incidence and risk associated with these embryonic remnants in neonates are not well studied. The following report describes a cyanotic neonate with a large Eustachian valve remnant creating a functional cor triatriatum dexter who was initially diagnosed with persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn. The cyanosis in this infant improved over the first postnatal week with conservative management, but she suffered multifocal subcortical stroke, likely related to her intracardiac shunt. The clinical presentation and questions regarding long-term management of this rare diagnosis are explored.

Full text links

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Group 7SearchHeart failure treatmentPapersTopicsCollectionsEffects of Sodium-Glucose Cotransporter 2 Inhibitors for the Treatment of Patients With Heart Failure Importance: Only 1 class of glucose-lowering agents-sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors-has been reported to decrease the risk of cardiovascular events primarily by reducingSeptember 1, 2017: JAMA CardiologyAssociations of albuminuria in patients with chronic heart failure: findings in the ALiskiren Observation of heart Failure Treatment study.CONCLUSIONS: Increased UACR is common in patients with heart failure, including non-diabetics. Urinary albumin creatininineJul, 2011: European Journal of Heart FailureRandomized Controlled TrialEffects of Liraglutide on Clinical Stability Among Patients With Advanced Heart Failure and Reduced Ejection Fraction: A Randomized Clinical Trial.Review

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Read by QxMD is copyright © 2021 QxMD Software Inc. All rights reserved. By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app