Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Diversity and sources of rapidly growing mycobacteria associated with infections following cardiac surgery.

Eighty-nine isolates of rapidly growing mycobacteria associated with cardiac bypass-related infections were characterized. Isolates from sporadic infections belonged to eight taxonomic groups and displayed numerous multilocus enzyme genotypes, plasmid profiles, and heavy metal and antibiotic resistance patterns. Compared with 449 noncardiac wound isolates, 45 sporadic cardiac isolates were more likely to be Mycobacterium fortuitum and M. smegmatis and less likely to be M. chelonae. About 80% of cardiac and noncardiac isolates were from southern coastal states. Eight outbreaks of cardiac bypass-related infections were identified. Strains from each outbreak were genotypically distinctive, and five outbreaks involved more than one strain. In two outbreaks, isolates from environmental sources and noncardiac infections were similar or identical to isolates from sternal wound infections. The heterogeneity of these isolates suggests that most isolates are unrelated and are derived from local environmental sources rather than from contaminated commercial surgical materials or devices.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app