REVIEW
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

The dangers of the "Head Down" position in patients with untreated pituitary macroadenomas: case series and review of literature.

Pituitary 2018 June
PURPOSE: Cavernous sinus syndrome is a rare phenomenon, characterized by simultaneous neuropathies of cranial nerves III-VI. Various pathological processes have been reported as precipitating etiologies, including infection, inflammation, vascular lesions, and neoplasms.

PURPOSE: We report a unique case series of cavernous sinus syndrome attributable to prolonged Trendelenburg or prone positioning during non-cranial procedures and review the pertinent literature to enlighten on this rare but catastrophic phenomenon.

METHODS: Retrospective case series.

RESULTS: In the past year we encountered two patients who presented with acute cavernous sinus syndrome upon awakening from non-cranial operations. One patient underwent an extensive urologic resection of a bladder malignancy positioned in Trendelenburg for approximately 4 h. The second patient underwent a lumbar laminectomy and discectomy in prone position. Both patients were discovered to have infarcted large pituitary macroadenomas as the etiology of their acute ophthalmoplegias, and transnasal, transsphenoidal resection was performed acutely to decompress the cavernous sinus contents. Pathologic analysis of the resected specimens in each case confirmed necrotic, infarcted pituitary adenoma. Both patients made a complete recovery with no evidence of residual or recurrent tumor in short term follow-up.

CONCLUSION: We report a brief case series of acute cavernous sinus syndrome resulting from dependent positioning during non-cranial operations in patients with pituitary macroadenoma. Although rare, this highlights a potential danger of "head down" positioning in patients with intracranial pathology-particularly in or around the sella and cavernous sinus. Despite multiple cranial neuropathies upon presentation, both patients made complete recovery following surgical decompression of the cavernous sinuses.

Full text links

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Group 7SearchHeart failure treatmentPapersTopicsCollectionsEffects of Sodium-Glucose Cotransporter 2 Inhibitors for the Treatment of Patients With Heart Failure Importance: Only 1 class of glucose-lowering agents-sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors-has been reported to decrease the risk of cardiovascular events primarily by reducingSeptember 1, 2017: JAMA CardiologyAssociations of albuminuria in patients with chronic heart failure: findings in the ALiskiren Observation of heart Failure Treatment study.CONCLUSIONS: Increased UACR is common in patients with heart failure, including non-diabetics. Urinary albumin creatininineJul, 2011: European Journal of Heart FailureRandomized Controlled TrialEffects of Liraglutide on Clinical Stability Among Patients With Advanced Heart Failure and Reduced Ejection Fraction: A Randomized Clinical Trial.Review

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Read by QxMD is copyright © 2021 QxMD Software Inc. All rights reserved. By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app