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Catheter Ablation of Ventricular Tachycardia in Structurally Normal Hearts: Indications, Strategies, and Outcomes-Part I.

Catheter ablation of ventricular tachycardia (VT) is being increasingly performed; yet, there is often confusion regarding indications, outcomes, and how to identify those patient populations most likely to benefit. The management strategy differs between those with structural heart disease and those without. For the former, an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) is typically required due to an elevated risk for sudden cardiac death, and catheter ablation can be used as adjunctive therapy to treat or prevent repetitive ICD therapies. In contrast, VT or premature ventricular contractions in the setting of a structurally normal heart carries a low risk for sudden cardiac death; accordingly, there is typically no indication for an ICD. In these patients, catheter ablation is considered for symptom management or to treat tachycardiomyopathy and is potentially curative. Here, the authors discuss the pathophysiology, mechanism, and management of VT that occurs in the setting of a structurally normal heart and the role of catheter ablation.

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