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Effects of 8-Hydroxyisocapnolactone-2-3-diol and friedelin on mast cell degranulation.

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effects of friedelin (terpenoid) and 8-hydroxyisocapnolactone-2-3-diol (coumarin) with concentration 10 μM, 30 μM, and 100 μM on inhibiting mast cells (MCs) degranulation.

METHODS: The investigation was performed in vitro by administering each compound into rat peritoneal MCs and rat basophilic leukemia-2H3 cells followed by activation with 50 μg/mL of compound 48/80 or 1 μM of ionomycin. The concentration of histamine released from each group was measured by a high-performance liquid chromatography-fluorometry system with post-column derivatization using o-phthalaldehyde.

RESULTS: 8-Hydroxyisocapnolactone-2-3-diol inhibited degranulation of compound 48/80 activated-rat peritoneal MCs with the histamine release percentages of 74.57%, 72.21% and 51.79% when the 10 μM, 30 μM and 100 μM concentrations were used, respectively. Where as about 81% histamine was released by the control group. Degranulation inhibition ability was also observed in ionomycin-activated rat basophilic leukemia-2H3 cells. In contrast, friedelin failed to inhibit degranulation in either cell type. The inhibition of 8-hydroxyisocapnolactone-2-3-diol was not related to the depletion of histamine synthesis as implied by the total histamine measurement.

CONCLUSIONS: These results exhibit the promising of 8-hydroxyisocapnolactone-2-3-diol is a potential parent structure for developing a MCs stabilizer.

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