Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
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Effects of Shaker exercise in stroke survivors with oropharyngeal dysphagia.

BACKGROUND: Dysphagia after stroke can cause a variety of complications, especially aspiration pneumonia, which can be life-threatening. Therefore, rehabilitation methods to reduce aspiration in patients with dysphagia are important.

OBJECTIVE: In the present study, we aimed to investigate the effects of Shaker exercise on aspiration and oral diet level in stroke survivors with dysphagia.

METHODS: Participants were randomly assigned to an experimental group (n = 16) or a control group (n = 16). Participants in the experimental group performed Shaker exercise and conventional dysphagia therapy, whereas those in the control group performed only conventional dysphagia therapy. All participants performed training 5 days a week for 4 weeks. Degree of aspiration was assessed using the Penetration-Aspiration Scale (PAS) based on videofluoroscopic swallowing study, while oral diet level was assessed using the Functional Oral Intake Scale (FOIS).

RESULTS: The experimental group showed greater improvement on both the PAS (p < 0.05) and FOIS (p < 0.05) compared with the control group.

CONCLUSIONS: The results of this study suggest that Shaker exercise is a effective exercise for recovery of swallowing function in stroke survivors with dysphagia.

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