JOURNAL ARTICLE
REVIEW
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Role of cardiac pacing in congenital complete heart block.

Congenital complete heart block affects 1/15,000 live-born infants, predominantly due to atrioventricular nodal injury from maternal antibodies of mothers with systemic lupus erythermatosus or Sjogren's syndrome. The majority of these children will need a pacemaker implanted prior to becoming young adults. This article will review the various patient and technical factors that influence the type of pacemaker implanted, and the current literature on optimal pacing practices. Areas covered: A literature search was performed using PubMed, Embase and Web of Science. Data regarding epicardial versus transvenous implants, pacing-induced ventricular dysfunction, alternative pacing strategies (including biventricular pacing, left ventricular pacing, and His bundle pacing), and complications with pacemakers in the pediatric population were reviewed. Expert commentary: There are numerous pacing strategies available to children with congenital complete heart block. The risks and benefits of the initial implant should be weighed against the long-term issues inherent with a life-time of pacing.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app