JOURNAL ARTICLE

Hospital-Associated Hypernatremia Spectrum and Clinical Outcomes in an Unselected Cohort

Evangelos Tsipotis, Lori Lyn Price, Bertrand L Jaber, Nicolaos E Madias
American Journal of Medicine 2018, 131 (1): 72-82.e1
28860033

BACKGROUND: Although hypernatremia is associated with adverse outcomes, most studies examined selected populations.

METHODS: Discharge data of 19,072 unselected hospitalized adults were analyzed. The crude relationship between serum sodium [Na+ ] and mortality defined hypernatremia as serum [Na+ ] >142 mEq/L. Patients with community-acquired hypernatremia or hospital-acquired hypernatremia were compared with normonatremic patients (admission [Na+ ] 138-142 mEq/L) regarding in-hospital mortality, length of stay, and discharge disposition. Patients with community-acquired hypernatremia whose hypernatremia worsened during hospitalization were compared with those without aggravation.

RESULTS: Community-acquired hypernatremia occurred in 21% of hospitalized patients and was associated with an adjusted odds ratio (OR) of 1.67 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.38-2.01) for in-hospital mortality and 1.44 (95% CI, 1.32-1.56) for discharge to a short-/long-term care facility and an adjusted 10% (95% CI, 7-13) increase in length of stay. Hospital-acquired hypernatremia developed in 25.9% of hospitalized patients and was associated with an adjusted OR of 3.17 (95% CI, 2.45-4.09) for in-hospital mortality and 1.45 (95% CI, 1.32-1.59) for discharge to a facility, and an adjusted 49% (95% CI, 44-53) increase in length of stay. Hospital-aggravated hypernatremia developed in 11.7% of patients with community-acquired hypernatremia and was associated with greater risk of in-hospital mortality (adjusted OR, 1.84; 95% CI, 1.32-2.56) and discharge to a facility (adjusted OR, 2.14; 95% CI, 1.71-2.69), and an adjusted 16% (95% CI, 7-27) increase in length of stay.

CONCLUSIONS: The hypernatremia spectrum in unselected hospitalized patients is independently associated with increased in-hospital mortality and heightened resource consumption.

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