Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

MDCT of the temporal bone and audiological findings of pediatric acquired cholesteatoma.

Cholesteatoma is a benign epithelial lesion affecting the middle ear and/or mastoid process, causing otorrhea and hearing loss. Here, we retrospectively evaluated the temporal multidetector computed tomography and audiological findings of acquired cholesteatoma in children. Forty-three patients younger than 18 years old with middle ear acquired cholesteatoma were evaluated with regard to their clinical symptoms, temporal multidetector computed tomography findings, and audiometry results. The multidetector computed tomography findings were classified according to the site-ossicle-complication classification, and the relationships between the clinical, radiological, and audiological findings were evaluated. Only one patient had pars tensa cholesteatoma, and the remaining had attic cholesteatoma. The most common site-ossicles-complication classifications were S4 (acquired cholesteatoma involving four sites), O1 (involving one ossicle), and C0 (no complications), and the most common complaint was hearing loss, followed by otorrhea. There were no statistically significant relationships between the site of involvement and ossicle involvement. In addition, there were no statistically significant differences according to the S classification in either the air conduction or air-bone-gap levels; however, these levels differed statistically significantly with increasing ossicle involvement. Early diagnosis and treatment are essential to prevent hearing loss and serious complications in cases of acquired cholesteatoma. Therefore, it is important to evaluate the temporal multidetector computed tomography and audiological findings to accurately diagnose acquired cholesteatoma in children.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app