ENGLISH ABSTRACT
JOURNAL ARTICLE
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

[Functional outcome following high-pressure injection injuries of the hand].

Background High-pressure injection injuries are devastating injuries that often lead to an amputation of the primarily affected finger. The available literature mainly focuses on amputation rates, while there is a lack of knowledge regarding functional results. Patients and Methods Between 1998 and 2016, 47 cases of high-pressure injection injuries of the hand were registered in our department. Out of these, data of 26 patients, all men with an average age of 42 (18-62) years, were included in a retrospective follow-up examination after 4 (1-12) years. We recorded DASH scores, pain intensity on visual analogue scales (VAS, 1-10), fingertip-to-palm distance, active range of wrist motion, grip strength, and two-point-discrimination ability (2PD). The statistical analysis was descriptive and was performed by analysis of correlation. Results The average DASH score of these 26 patients was 45 (30-93), pain intensity was 2.5 (0-9) on the VAS, fingertip-to-palm distance was 1 (0-4) cm. Active range of wrist motion was 99 (77-122) % of the contralateral side. Average grip strength was reduced to 67 (0-164) % of the contralateral side. Average 2PD was 9 (2-25) mm. Nineteen out of 26 patients returned to work. An amputation was necessary in 7 out of 26 cases. These patients had more pain and less grip strength. High latency from injury to operative treatment impaired functional outcome, which was statistically significant for DASH (p < 0.05). A trend to poorer outcomes was noted in cases of a more distal lesion and injection of toxic substances, whereas high injection pressure had no negative influence. Conclusion High-pressure injection injuries have serious consequences regarding hand function and frequently cause chronic pain. This affects patients with finger preservation as well as patients requiring an amputation. A further evaluation of prognostic factors requires a metaanalysis of functional parameters. The DASH score seems to be an expedient assessment tool.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app