Journal Article
Observational Study
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The repeatability of computed tomography lung volume measurements: Comparisons in healthy subjects, patients with obstructive lung disease, and patients with restrictive lung disease.

In this study, we examined the repeatability of computed tomography (CT) lung volume measurements in healthy individuals and patients with obstructive and restrictive lung diseases. To do this, we retrospectively enrolled 200 healthy individuals (group 1), 100 patients with obstructive lung disease (group 2), and 100 patients with restrictive lung disease (group 3) who underwent two consecutive chest CT scans within a 1-year period. The CT lung volume was measured using a threshold-based, three-dimensional auto-segmentation technique at a default range from -200 to -1024 HU. The within-subject standard deviation, repeatability coefficient, within-subject coefficient variability, and intraclass correlation coefficient were evaluated. No significant differences were identified between the two consecutive CT lung volume measurements in any of the groups (p> 0.05). The within-subject standard deviations for groups 1, 2, and 3 were 441.1, 387.0, and 288.6, respectively, while the repeatability coefficients were 1222.6, 1072.6, and 800.1, respectively. The within-subject coefficient variabilities for groups 1, 2, and 3 were 0.097, 0.083, and 0.090, respectively, while the intraclass correlation coefficients were 0.818, 0.881, and 0.910, respectively. The two CT lung volume measurements showed excellent agreement in healthy individuals and patients with obstructive or restrictive lung disease. However, the repeatability was lower in healthy individuals than it was in patients with lung diseases.

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