Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Pulmonary vasodilator therapy is associated with greater survival in Eisenmenger syndrome.

Heart 2017 August 10
OBJECTIVE: Eisenmenger syndrome (ES) is a severe form of pulmonary hypertension in adults with congenital heart disease (CHD) and has a poor prognosis. We aimed to understand factors associated with survival in ES and particularly to assess the potential benefits of advanced pulmonary vasodilator therapy (AT).

METHODS: From January 2004, when AT became generally available for patients with ES, we followed 253 ES adults from 12 adult congenital heart disease centres across Australia and New Zealand. Demographic, medical and outcome data were collected and analysed prospectively and retrospectively.

RESULTS: The patients with ES were predominantly female (60%), aged 31 (SD 12) years. At diagnosis of ES, 64% were WHO functional class ≥3. The most common underlying lesion was ventricular septal defect (33%) with 21% having 'complex' anatomy. Over a median follow-up time of 9.1 years, the majority (72%) had been prescribed at least one AT (49% single agent), mostly bosentan (66%, 168 patients). The mean time on AT was 6 (SD 3.6) years. Those on AT were more functionally impaired at presentation (69% WHO ≥3 vs 51%, p=0.007) and more likely to have been prescribed anticoagulation (47% vs 27%, p=0.003). The risk of death/transplant was 4.8 %/year in AT exposed versus 8.4% in those never exposed. On multivariabl e analysis, exposure to AT was independently associated with greater survival (survival HR 2.27, 95% CI 1.49 to 3.45; p<0.001). WHO ≥3 at presentation was associated with a worse prognosis (mortality HR 1.82, 95% CI 1.19 to 2.78; p=0.006).

CONCLUSION: Treatment with AT was independently associated with greater survival in patients with ES, even though they were comparatively sicker prior to treatment.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app