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Treatment Response in Pediatric Patients With Pseudotumor Cerebri Syndrome.

BACKGROUND: Pseudotumor cerebri syndrome (PTCS) is a disorder defined by increased intracranial pressure in the absence of an intracranial space-occupying lesion. This retrospective study aimed to examine the outcomes in children with PTCS.

METHODS: Data was collected retrospectively from the charts of consecutive pediatric patients treated for PTCS at our hospital between 2000 and 2007 (60 patients; 36 females, 24 males).

RESULTS: Forty-six patients (76.6%) responded well to acetazolamide therapy, with full resolution of symptoms, including papilledema (average treatment duration 1 year; range: 1 month-5 years). Of the 14 patients with no response to treatment, 9 (23.4%) required surgical intervention. Nonresponders tended to be younger at presentation (8.7 vs 11.5 years, P = 0.04). Twelve patients (26%) experienced relapse after acetazolamide was discontinued. The group that experienced relapse was significantly younger than the nonrelapsers (8.9 vs 12.1 years, P < 0.05).

CONCLUSIONS: Younger age at presentation with PTCS was found to be a risk factor for treatment failure or relapse.

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