JOURNAL ARTICLE
MULTICENTER STUDY
OBSERVATIONAL STUDY
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Current Management of Hyponatremia in Acute Heart Failure: A Report From the Hyponatremia Registry for Patients With Euvolemic and Hypervolemic Hyponatremia (HN Registry).

BACKGROUND: Hyponatremia (HN) occurs commonly in patients with acute heart failure and confers a worse prognosis. Current HN treatment varies widely, with no consensus. This study recorded treatment practices currently used for patients hospitalized with acute heart failure and HN.

METHODS AND RESULTS: Data were collected prospectively from 146 US sites on patients hospitalized with acute heart failure and HN (serum sodium concentration [Na+ ] ≤130 mEq/L) present at admission or developing in the hospital. Baseline variables, HN treatment, and laboratory values were recorded. Of 762 patients, median [Na+ ] was 126 mEq/L (interquartile range, 7) at baseline and increased to 130 mEq/L at discharge. Fluid restriction was the most commonly prescribed therapy (44%), followed by no specific HN treatment beyond therapy for congestion (23%), isotonic saline (5%), tolvaptan (4%), and hypertonic saline (2%). Median rate of change in [Na+ ] varied by treatment (0.5 [interquartile range, 1.0] to 2.3 [8.0] mEq/L/d) and median treatment duration ranged from 1 (interquartile range, 1) to 6 (5) days. Fluid restriction and no specific HN treatment resulted in similar changes in [Na+ ], and were least effective in correcting HN. Few patients (19%) had [Na+ ] ≥135 mEq/L at discharge.

CONCLUSIONS: The most commonly used treatment approaches for HN (fluid restriction and no specific treatment) in acute heart failure increased [Na+ ] minimally, and most patients remained hyponatremic at discharge.

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