JOURNAL ARTICLE
RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
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Pre-operative identification of patients at high risk of deep venous thrombosis after elective major abdominal surgery.

Lancet 1986 May 25
Eighteen items of clinical and laboratory information were measured on the day before operation in 85 patients who underwent elective major abdominal surgery. Postoperatively, deep venous thrombosis (DVT) was detected by 125I-fibrinogen scan in 23 patients. Stepwise logistic discriminant analysis was used to identify factors which predicted DVT. Seven such factors were identified, which were then used to construct a predictive index. In descending order of predictive power, they were: age, euglobulin lysis time (ELT), previous abdominal surgery, varicose veins, antithrombin III concentration, cigarette smoking, and platelet count. Pre-operatively, the predictive index correctly identified 91% of the patients in whom DVT developed, and wrongly allocated to the high-risk group 19% of those in whom it did not. A shortened version of the predictive index based only on age and ELT (I = -11.5 + 0.133 age + 0.006 ELT) was 91% sensitive and 63% specific in the prediction of DVT. In a prospective study of 43 patients, this shortened predictive index correctly identified pre-operatively 93% of patients in whom DVT developed, and wrongly allocated to the high-risk group only 17% of those in whom it did not.

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