Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Bedaquiline: a new hope for shorter and better anti-tuberculosis regimens.

Background: In 2014, an estimated 1.8 million people died from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB); moreover, 680,000 people developed multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB).

Methods: Currently available anti-MDR and XDR regimens are long-lasting and expensive, need high adherence and are undermined by a high frequency of adverse drug events, thus leading to a low success rate; moreover, in the last 50 years only two new molecules, bedaquiline (BDQ) and delamanid, have been approved and released for treatment of MDR-TB.

Results: BDQ is a diarylquinoline anti-mycobacterial drug, active regardless the state of MTB; in fact, its efficacy is conserved against replicating and non-replicating bacilli, despite extracellular or intracellular location. BDQ has been approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) only for combination treatment of pulmonary multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB), in adults patients, when an effective treatment cannot be provided otherwise due to resistance or poor tolerability; however, due to high bactericidal activity, BDQ may be used in future to treat extrapulmonary tuberculosis and Mycobacterium other than tuberculosis (MOTT) infection.

Conclusion: BDQ may play a major role to get closer to TB eradication and to ensure higher retention in care, even in fully susceptible MTB strains and against non-replicating mycobacteria in latent-TB, providing an alternative to standard regimen.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app