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Osteoporosis Management in Ankylosing Spondylitis.

Low bone mineral density (BMD) is increasingly recognized as a common comorbid condition in ankylosing spondylitis (AS). As low BMD increases fracture risk, it is important to identify and treat low BMD in patients with AS who have been shown to be at increased risk for fractures above the population normal. Since low BMD occurs early in disease, we screen during the first year of diagnosis with dual energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA). If patients are found to have osteoporosis by T-score of less than -2.5 or if their Z-score on DXA is more than two standard deviations below the mean, we initiate therapy with bisphosphonates in males and in females who are not planning any future pregnancies. While reduction in fracture risk with bisphosphonate therapy has not been clearly defined in patients with AS, reduction in vertebral and hip fractures has been well established in primary osteoporosis and thus it is our first line treatment. If there are contraindications to the use of bisphosphonates in the treatment of low BMD, we will consider the use of denosumab. If the patient is not receiving a TNF-alpha inhibitor (TNFi) and has active disease, we also favor early initiation of TNFi due to their positive effects on BMD though the outcome on reduction in vertebral fractures remains unclear. We counsel all patients regarding the importance of adequate intake of vitamin D and calcium per the Institute of Medicine guidelines. All patients should be encouraged to participate in weight-bearing activities with a focus on core strength and gait training.

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