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[Diverticulitis : Domain of conservative or drug therapy?]

Der Internist 2017 July
Increasing interest in diverticular disease by the scientific community in the last 10-15 years has resulted in an increased number of publications. Among other things, nonevidence-based therapeutic paradigms were tested in randomized, controlled therapy studies. The importance of surgery in the therapy of diverticulitis has diminished in recent years; in particular, it has no role in the treatment of diverticulitis types 1a, 1b, and 2a according to the Classification of Diverticular Disease (CDD) treated successfully by conservative means. Surgery has only a subordinate role in recurrent type 3b diverticulitis according to the CDD. Diverticulitis is therefore increasingly treated using conservative or drug therapy. However, only the classic, established antibiotics are currently available as effective drugs for the treatment of diverticular disease. However, these are also decreasing in significance. Over 90% of patients with type 1a/1b diverticulitis can be safely treated according to current data without the use of antibiotics. It is possible that type 2a diverticulitis will also be successfully treated without antibiotics in the future. Substances such as rifaximin, mesalazine, or probiotics, which were tested above all in patients with chronic recurrent forms (CDD type 3a/3b), have not yet been established.

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