JOURNAL ARTICLE
REVIEW

ACR Appropriateness Criteria ® Radiologic Management of Mesenteric Ischemia

Nicholas Fidelman, Ali F AbuRahma, Brooks D Cash, Baljendra S Kapoor, M-Grace Knuttinen, Jeet Minocha, Paul J Rochon, Colette M Shaw, Charles E Ray, Jonathan M Lorenz
Journal of the American College of Radiology: JACR 2017, 14 (5S): S266-S271
28473083
Mesenteric vascular insufficiency is a serious medical condition that may lead to bowel infarction, morbidity, and mortality that may approach 50%. Recommended therapy for acute mesenteric ischemia includes aspiration embolectomy, transcatheter thrombolysis, and angioplasty with or without stenting for the treatment of underlying arterial stenosis. Nonocclusive mesenteric ischemia may respond to transarterial infusion of vasodilators such as nitroglycerin, papaverine, glucagon, and prostaglandin E1. Recommended therapy for chronic mesenteric ischemia includes angioplasty with or without stent placement and, if an endovascular approach is not possible, surgical bypass or endarterectomy. The diagnosis of median arcuate ligament syndrome is controversial, but surgical release may be appropriate depending on the clinical situation. Venous mesenteric ischemia may respond to systemic anticoagulation alone. Transhepatic or transjugular superior mesenteric vein catheterization and thrombolytic infusion can be offered depending on the severity of symptoms, condition of the patient, and response to systemic anticoagulation. Adjunct transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt creation can be considered for outflow improvement. The American College of Radiology Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed annually by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and revision include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer-reviewed journals and the application of well-established methodologies (RAND/UCLA Appropriateness Method and Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation or GRADE) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures for specific clinical scenarios. In those instances where evidence is lacking or equivocal, expert opinion may supplement the available evidence to recommend imaging or treatment.

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