Journal Article
Review
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Intestinal Drug Interactions Mediated by OATPs: A Systematic Review of Preclinical and Clinical Findings.

In recent years, an increasing number of clinical drug-drug interactions (DDIs) have been attributed to inhibition of intestinal organic anion-transporting polypeptides (OATPs); however, only a few of these DDI results were reflected in drug labels. This review aims to provide a thorough analysis of intestinal OATP-mediated pharmacokinetic-based DDIs, using both in vitro and clinical investigations, highlighting the main mechanistic findings and discussing their clinical relevance. On the basis of pharmacogenetic and clinical DDI results, a total of 12 drugs were identified as possible clinical substrates of OATP2B1 and OATP1A2. Among them, 3 drugs, namely atenolol, celiprolol, and fexofenadine, have emerged as the most sensitive substrates to evaluate clinical OATP-mediated intestinal DDIs when interactions with P-glycoprotein by the test compound can be ruled out. With regard to perpetrators, 8 dietary or natural products and 1 investigational drug, ronacaleret (now terminated), showed clinical intestinal inhibition attributable to OATPs, producing ≥20% decreases in area under the plasma concentration-time curve of the co-administered drug. Common juices, such as apple juice, grapefruit juice, and orange juice, are considered potent inhibitors of intestinal OATP2B1 and OATP1A2 (decreasing exposure of the co-administered substrate by ∼85%) and may be adequate prototype inhibitors to investigate intestinal DDIs mediated by OATPs.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app