JOURNAL ARTICLE
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Survey of kinesiologists' functional capacity evaluation practice in Canada.

BACKGROUND: In Canada, functional capacity evaluations (FCEs) are commonly administered by several health care professions including kinesiologists. Kinesiologists have been recently regulated as health care professionals in Ontario and we know little about their demographics, the frequency of FCE administration, or the types of FCEs used by this group.

OBJECTIVE: The purposes of this study were to identify: 1) the demographic characteristics and FCE education of kinesiology FCE practitioners; 2) the FCE systems most used by these practitioners and 3) the constructs from assessments used to determine functional capacity.

METHODS: A survey was distributed to members of the Canadian Kinesiology Alliance. Descriptive statistics and frequency distributions were calculated from the survey responses (n = 77).

RESULTS: FCE practitioners were represented by kinesiologists (79%) practicing more than 15 years and 1-5 years, who received FCE training from a certification course. ARCON (23%) was the most common FCE system used. Low-level lifting (43%), mid-lift (38%), pulling (38%) and walking (38%) are the most common FCE task components used to assess functional capacity. Although kinesiologists consider multiple factors when making decisions about task component endpoints, biomechanical observations/body mechanics are the primary methods used.

CONCLUSIONS: Kinesiologists are conducting FCEs for the primary purpose of preparing return-to-work or workplace accommodation recommendations. Although functional capacity is determined using multiple factors, there is an emphasis on biomechanics and body mechanics. Focusing FCE training and research on these constructs may provide opportunities to further strengthen the reliability and validity of FCE outcomes.

Full text links

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Group 7SearchHeart failure treatmentPapersTopicsCollectionsEffects of Sodium-Glucose Cotransporter 2 Inhibitors for the Treatment of Patients With Heart Failure Importance: Only 1 class of glucose-lowering agents-sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors-has been reported to decrease the risk of cardiovascular events primarily by reducingSeptember 1, 2017: JAMA CardiologyAssociations of albuminuria in patients with chronic heart failure: findings in the ALiskiren Observation of heart Failure Treatment study.CONCLUSIONS: Increased UACR is common in patients with heart failure, including non-diabetics. Urinary albumin creatininineJul, 2011: European Journal of Heart FailureRandomized Controlled TrialEffects of Liraglutide on Clinical Stability Among Patients With Advanced Heart Failure and Reduced Ejection Fraction: A Randomized Clinical Trial.Review

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Read by QxMD is copyright © 2021 QxMD Software Inc. All rights reserved. By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app