JOURNAL ARTICLE

Pharmacologic treatments for rosacea

Alison M Layton
Clinics in Dermatology 2017, 35 (2): 207-212
28274361
Rosacea represents a common and chronic inflammatory skin disorder. Clinical features include transient and permanent erythema, inflammatory papules and pustules, phymatous changes, and ocular signs and symptoms. Rosacea is generally classified into four subtypes and one variant. Subtype 1, erythematotelangiectatic rosacea, includes clinical features of flushing and persistent central facial erythema with or without telangiectasia. Subtype 2, papulopustular rosacea, is characterized by persistent central facial erythema with transient papules or pustules or both on the central face. Subtype 3, phymatous rosacea, includes thickening of the skin with irregular surface nodularities and enlargement. Subtype 4, ocular rosacea, includes inflammation of different parts of the eye and eyelid. A variant, granulomatous rosacea, is noninflammatory and is characterized by hard, brown, yellow, or red cutaneous papules or nodules of uniform size. Patients may present with more than one subtype, and each individual characteristic may fluctuate. There is debate whether rosacea progresses from one subtype over time or subtypes represent discreet entities. Defining clinical presentation and improved understanding of pathophysiology has resulted in identification of novel treatment approaches. This contribution outlines a rationale for treatment, highlights an evidence-based approach with approved treatments, and considers novel developments and off-license therapy available.

Full Text Links

Find Full Text Links for this Article

Discussion

You are not logged in. Sign Up or Log In to join the discussion.

Related Papers

Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
28274361
×

Save your favorite articles in one place with a free QxMD account.

×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"