COMPARATIVE STUDY
JOURNAL ARTICLE

Asthma-COPD overlap syndrome in the US: a prospective population-based analysis of patient-reported outcomes and health care utilization

Carlos A Vaz Fragoso, Terrence E Murphy, George O Agogo, Heather G Allore, Gail J McAvay
International Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease 2017, 12: 517-527
28223792

BACKGROUND: Prior work suggests that asthma-COPD overlap syndrome (ACOS) has a greater health burden than asthma alone or COPD alone. In the current study, we have further evaluated the health burden of ACOS in a nationally representative sample of the US population, focusing on patient-reported outcomes and health care utilization and on comparisons with asthma alone and COPD alone. Patient-reported outcomes are especially meaningful, as these include functional activities that are highly valued by patients and are the basis for patient-centered care.

METHODS: Using data from the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS), we evaluated patient-reported outcomes and health care utilization among participants who were aged 40-85 years and had self-reported, physician-diagnosed asthma or COPD. MEPS administered five rounds of interviews, at baseline and approximately every 6 months over 2.5 years. Patient-reported outcomes included activities of daily living (ADLs), mobility, social/recreational activities, disability days in bed, and health status (Short Form 12, Version 2). Health care utilization included outpatient and emergency department (ED) visits, and hospitalization.

RESULTS: Of 3,486 participants with asthma or COPD, 1,585 (45.4%) had asthma alone, 1,294 (37.1%) had COPD alone, and 607 (17.4%) had ACOS. Relative to asthma alone, ACOS was significantly associated with higher odds of prevalent disability in ADLs and limitations in mobility and social/recreational activities (adjusted odds ratios [adjORs]: 1.91-3.98), as well as with higher odds of incident limitations in mobility and social/recreational activities, disability days in bed, and respiratory-based outpatient and ED visits, and hospitalization (adjORs: 1.86-2.35). In addition, ACOS had significantly worse physical and mental health scores than asthma alone (P-values <0.0001). Relative to COPD alone, ACOS was significantly associated with higher odds of prevalent limitations in mobility and social/recreational activities (adjORs: 1.68-2.06), as well as with higher odds of incident disability days in bed and respiratory-based outpatient and ED visits (adjORs: 1.48-1.74). In addition, ACOS had a significantly worse physical health score, but similar mental health score, as compared with COPD alone (P-values 0.0025 and 0.1578, respectively).

CONCLUSION: In the US, ACOS is associated with a greater health burden, including patient-reported outcomes and health care utilization, relative to asthma alone and COPD alone.

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