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Nanocarriers as treatment modalities for hypertension.

Drug Delivery 2017 November
Hypertension, a worldwide epidemic at present, is not a disease in itself rather it is an important risk factor for serious cardiovascular disorders including myocardial infarction, stroke, heart failure, and peripheral artery disease. Though numerous drugs acting via different mechanism of action are available in the market as conventional formulations for the treatment of hypertension but they face substantial challenges regarding their bioavailability, dosing and associated adverse effects which greatly limit their therapeutic efficacies. Various studies have demonstrated that nanocarriers can significantly increase the drug bioavailability thereby reducing the frequency of dosing in addition to minimizing toxicity associated with high dose of the drug. The present review provides an insight into the challenges associated with the conventional antihypertensive formulations and need for oral nanoparticulate systems in order to overcome problems associated with conventional formulations. Hypertension has circadian pattern of blood pressure, therefore chronotherapeutics can play a decisive role for the treatment, and however, nanoparticulate system can play major role in hypertension management. Future prospective for particulate nanocarriers in drug delivery for hypertension includes chronotherapeutics and emerging technique like gene therapy which is also covered in the review.

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