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Avascular Necrosis Is Associated With Increased Transfusions and Readmission Following Primary Total Hip Arthroplasty.

Orthopedics 2017 May 2
Avascular necrosis (AVN) may confer an increased risk of complications and readmission following total hip arthroplasty (THA). However, current risk-adjustment models do not account for AVN. A total of 1706 patients who underwent THA for AVN from 2011 to 2013 were selected from the American College of Surgeon's National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database and matched 1:1 to controls using a predetermined propensity score algorithm. Rates of 30-day medical and surgical complications, readmissions, and reoperations were compared between cohorts. Propensity-score logistic regression was used to determine independent associations between AVN and outcomes of interest. Patients with AVN had a higher rate of medical complications than those without AVN (20.3% vs 15.3%, respectively; P<.001). Bleeding transfusion was the most common medical complication, occurring at a significantly higher rate in patients with AVN than those without AVN (19.6% vs 13.9%, respectively; P<.001). Patients with AVN were also twice as likely to experience a readmission after THA (odds ratio, 2.093; 95% confidence interval, 1.385-3.164). Avascular necrosis of the femoral head is an independent risk factor for transfusion up to 72 hours postoperatively and readmission up to 30 days following total hip replacement. [Orthopedics. 2017; 40(3):171-176.].

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