JOURNAL ARTICLE

Real-world adherence assessment of lurasidone and other oral atypical antipsychotics among patients with schizophrenia: an administrative claims analysis

Krithika Rajagopalan, Sally Wade, Nicole Meyer, Antony Loebel
Current Medical Research and Opinion 2017, 33 (5): 813-820
28098496

OBJECTIVE: To compare adherence with lurasidone to other oral atypical antipsychotics among Medicaid and commercially insured patients with schizophrenia.

RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Administrative claims of patients with schizophrenia treated with atypical antipsychotics (lurasidone, aripiprazole, olanzapine, quetiapine, risperidone, or ziprasidone) from October 2010 to September 2011 were identified from MarketScan Commercial and Medicaid Databases, and were classified by the first (index) antipsychotic. Patients were 18-64 years, had insurance coverage 12 months pre- and 6 months post-index, and no pre-index use of the index drug.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Medication possession ratio (MPR), discontinuation rate, and mean time to discontinuation were assessed post-index. Pairwise comparisons (lurasidone versus each drug) were conducted using chi-square tests and Student's t-tests.

RESULTS: There were 146 Medicaid (mean age 43.5 years, 47.9% female) and 63 commercial (mean age 40.0 years, 42.9% female) patients treated with lurasidone. In the Medicaid population, the MPR for patients treated with lurasidone was 0.60, versus 0.41-0.48 for patients treated with other antipsychotics (all p < .05). Patients treated with lurasidone exhibited a lower discontinuation rate compared to patients treated with all other antipsychotics (49.3% versus 62.3%-68.3%, all p < .05). The mean time to discontinuation with lurasidone was significantly longer than with ziprasidone (p < .05). In the commercial population, the MPR for patients treated with lurasidone (0.61) was higher compared to patients treated with quetiapine (0.44) and ziprasidone (0.43) (both p < .05). The discontinuation rate (44.4%) was lower for patients treated with lurasidone compared to patients treated with all other antipsychotics except risperidone (p < .05). The mean time to discontinuation was longer for lurasidone than with other antipsychotics.

CONCLUSIONS: In Medicaid and commercial populations, patients treated with lurasidone demonstrated greater adherence compared to patients treated with other atypical antipsychotics. Limitations of using administrative claims data include potential errors or inconsistencies in coding, and lack of complete clinical information.

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