COMPARATIVE STUDY
JOURNAL ARTICLE

Image quality of mean temporal arterial and mean temporal portal venous phase images calculated from low dose dynamic volume perfusion CT datasets in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma and pancreatic cancer

X Wang, T Henzler, J Gawlitza, S Diehl, T Wilhelm, S O Schoenberg, Z Y Jin, H D Xue, A Smakic
European Journal of Radiology 2016, 85 (11): 2104-2110
27776665

PURPOSE: Dynamic volume perfusion CT (dVPCT) provides valuable information on tissue perfusion in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and pancreatic cancer. However, currently dVPCT is often performed in addition to conventional CT acquisitions due to the limited morphologic image quality of dose optimized dVPCT protocols. The aim of this study was to prospectively compare objective and subjective image quality, lesion detectability and radiation dose between mean temporal arterial (mTA) and mean temporal portal venous (mTPV) images calculated from low dose dynamic volume perfusion CT (dVPCT) datasets with linearly blended 120-kVp arterial and portal venous datasets in patients with HCC and pancreatic cancer.

MATERIALS AND METHODS: All patients gave written informed consent for this institutional review board-approved HIPAA compliant study. 27 consecutive patients (18 men, 9 women, mean age, 69.1 years±9.4) with histologically proven HCC or suspected pancreatic cancer were prospectively enrolled. The study CT protocol included a dVPCT protocol performed with 70 or 80kVp tube voltage (18 spiral acquisitions, 71.2s total acquisition times) and standard dual-energy (90/150kVpSn) arterial and portal venous acquisition performed 25min after the dVPCT. The mTA and mTPV images were manually reconstructed from the 3 to 5 best visually selected single arterial and 3 to 5 best single portal venous phases dVPCT dataset. The linearly blended 120-kVp images were calculated from dual-energy CT (DECT) raw data. Image noise, SNR, and CNR of the liver, abdominal aorta (AA) and main portal vein (PV) were compared between the mTA/mTPV and the linearly blended 120-kVp dual-energy arterial and portal venous datasets, respectively. Subjective image quality was evaluated by two radiologists regarding subjective image noise, sharpness and overall diagnostic image quality using a 5-point Likert Scale. In addition, liver lesion detectability was performed for each liver segment by the two radiologists using the linearly blended120-kVp arterial and portal venous datasets as the reference standard.

RESULTS: Image noise, SNR and CNR values of the mTA and mTPV were significantly higher when compared to the corresponding linearly blended arterial and portal venous 120-kVp datasets (all p<0.001) except for image noise within the PV in the portal venous phases (p=0.136).

OBJECTIVE: image quality of mTA and mTPV were rated significantly better when compared to the linearly blended 120-kVp arterial and portal venous datasets. Both readers were able to detect all liver lesions found on the linearly blended 120-kVp arterial and portal venous datasets using the mTA and mTPV datasets. The effective radiation dose of the dVPCT was 27.6mSv for the 80kVp protocol and 14.5mSv for the 70kVp protocol. The mean effective radiation dose for the linearly blended 120-kVp arterial and portal venous CT protocol together of the upper abdomen was 5.60mSv±1.48mSv.

CONCLUSION: Our preliminary data suggest that subjective and objective image quality of mTA and mTPV datasets calculated from low-kVp dVPCT datasets is non-inferior when compared to linearly blended 120-kVp arterial and portal venous acquisitions in patients with HCC and pancreatic cancer. Thus, dVPCT could be used as a stand-alone imaging technique without additionally performed conventional arterial and portal venous CT acquisitions.

Full Text Links

Find Full Text Links for this Article

Discussion

You are not logged in. Sign Up or Log In to join the discussion.

Related Papers

Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
27776665
×

Save your favorite articles in one place with a free QxMD account.

×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"