Clinical Study
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

The efficacy of fidaxomicin in the treatment of Clostridium difficile infection in a real-world clinical setting: a Spanish multi-centre retrospective cohort.

The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of fidaxomicin in the real-life clinical setting. This was a retrospective cohort of patients with Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) treated with fidaxomicin in 20 Spanish hospitals between July 2013 and July 2014. Clinical cure, 30-day recurrence, 30-day mortality, sustained cure, and factors associated with the failure to achieve sustained cure were analyzed. Of the 72 patients in the cohort 41 (56.9 %) had a fatal underlying disease. There were 44 (61.1 %) recurrent episodes and 26 cases (36.1 %) with a history of multiple recurrences. Most episodes were severe (26, 36 %) or severe-complicated (14, 19.4 %). Clinical cure rate was 90.3 %, recurrence rate was 16.7 % and three patients (4.2 %) died during the follow-up period. Sustained cure was achieved in 52 cases (72.2 %). Adverse events were reported in five cases (6.9 %). Factors associated with the lack of sustained cure were cardiovascular comorbidity (OR 11.4; 95 %CI 1.9-67.8), acute kidney failure (OR 7.4; 95 %CI 1.3-43.1), concomitant systemic antibiotic treatment (OR 6.2; 95 %CI 1.1-36.8), and C-reactive protein value at diagnosis (OR 1.2 for each 1 mg/dl increase; 95 %CI 1.03-1.3). Fidaxomicin is an effective and well tolerable treatment for severe CDI and for cases with elevated recurrence risk.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app