JOURNAL ARTICLE
MULTICENTER STUDY
RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL

Pediatric Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest Characteristics and Their Association With Survival and Neurobehavioral Outcome

Kathleen L Meert, Russell Telford, Richard Holubkov, Beth S Slomine, James R Christensen, J Michael Dean, Frank W Moler
Pediatric Critical Care Medicine 2016, 17 (12): e543-e550
27679965

OBJECTIVE: To investigate relationships between cardiac arrest characteristics and survival and neurobehavioral outcome among children recruited to the Therapeutic Hypothermia after Pediatric Cardiac Arrest Out-of-Hospital trial.

DESIGN: Secondary analysis of Therapeutic Hypothermia after Pediatric Cardiac Arrest Out-of-Hospital trial data.

SETTING: Thirty-six PICUs in the United States and Canada.

PATIENTS: All children (n = 295) had chest compressions for greater than or equal to 2 minutes, were comatose, and required mechanical ventilation after return of circulation.

INTERVENTIONS: Neurobehavioral function was assessed using the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales, Second Edition at baseline (reflecting prearrest status) and 12 months postarrest. U.S. norms for Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales, Second Edition scores are 100 (mean) ± 15 (SD). Higher scores indicate better functioning. Outcomes included 12-month survival and 12-month survival with Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales, Second Edition greater than or equal to 70.

MEASUREMENT AND MAIN RESULTS: Cardiac etiology of arrest, initial arrest rhythm of ventricular fibrillation/tachycardia, shorter duration of chest compressions, compressions not required at hospital arrival, fewer epinephrine doses, and witnessed arrest were associated with greater 12-month survival and 12-month survival with Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales, Second Edition greater than or equal to 70. Weekend arrest was associated with lower 12-month survival. Body habitus was associated with 12-month survival with Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales, Second Edition greater than or equal to 70; underweight children had better outcomes, and obese children had worse outcomes. On multivariate analysis, acute life threatening event/sudden unexpected infant death, chest compressions more than 30 minutes, and weekend arrest were associated with lower 12-month survival; witnessed arrest was associated with greater 12-month survival. Acute life threatening event/sudden unexpected infant death, other respiratory causes of arrest except drowning, other/unknown causes of arrest, and compressions more than 30 minutes were associated with lower 12-month survival with Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales, Second Edition greater than or equal to 70.

CONCLUSIONS: Many factors are associated with survival and neurobehavioral outcome among children who are comatose and require mechanical ventilation after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. These factors may be useful for identifying children at risk for poor outcomes, and for improving prevention and resuscitation strategies.

Full Text Links

Find Full Text Links for this Article

Discussion

You are not logged in. Sign Up or Log In to join the discussion.

Related Papers

Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
27679965
×

Save your favorite articles in one place with a free QxMD account.

×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"