JOURNAL ARTICLE
RESEARCH SUPPORT, N.I.H., EXTRAMURAL
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Genotype-phenotype correlations in hereditary elliptocytosis and hereditary pyropoikilocytosis.

Hereditary elliptocytosis (HE) and hereditary pyropoikilocytosis (HPP) are heterogeneous red blood cell (RBC) membrane disorders that result from mutations in the genes encoding α-spectrin (SPTA1), β-spectrin (SPTB), or protein 4.1R (EPB41). The resulting defects alter the horizontal cytoskeletal associations and affect RBC membrane stability and deformability causing shortened RBC survival. The clinical diagnosis of HE and HPP relies on identifying characteristic RBC morphology on peripheral blood smear and specific membrane biomechanical properties using osmotic gradient ektacytometry. However, this phenotypic diagnosis may not be readily available in patients requiring frequent transfusions, and does not predict disease course or severity. Using Next-Generation sequencing, we identified the causative genetic mutations in fifteen patients with clinically suspected HE or HPP and correlated the identified mutations with the clinical phenotype and ektacytometry profile. In addition to identifying three novel mutations, gene sequencing confirmed and, when the RBC morphology was not evaluable, identified the diagnosis. Moreover, genotypic differences justified the phenotypic differences within families with HE/HPP.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app