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JOURNAL ARTICLE

A comparison of the diagnostic value of MRI and 18 F-FDG-PET/CT in suspected spondylodiscitis

Carolijn Smids, Ilse J E Kouijzer, Fidel J Vos, Tom Sprong, Allard J F Hosman, Jacky W J de Rooy, Erik H J G Aarntzen, Lioe-Fee de Geus-Oei, Wim J G Oyen, Chantal P Bleeker-Rovers
Infection 2017, 45 (1): 41-49
27317050

PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic value of 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography and computed tomography (PET/CT scan) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in diagnosing spondylodiscitis and its complications, such as epidural and paraspinal abscesses.

METHODS: From January 2006 to August 2013 patients with a clinical suspicion of spondylodiscitis, with an infection, or with fever of unknown origin were retrospectively included if 18 F-FDG-PET/CT and MRI of the spine were performed within a 2-week time span. Imaging results were compared to the final clinical diagnosis and follow-up data were collected.

RESULTS: Sixty-eight patients were included of whom 49 patients were diagnosed with spondylodiscitis. MRI showed an overall sensitivity of 67 % and specificity of 84 %. Diagnostic accuracy was 58 %, when MRI was performed within 2 weeks after the start of symptoms and improved to 82 %, when performed more than 2 weeks after onset of symptoms. 18 F-FDG-PET/CT showed a sensitivity of 96 % and a specificity of 95 %, with no relation to the interval between the scan and the start of symptoms.

CONCLUSIONS: As compared to MRI, 18 F-FDG-PET/CT has superior diagnostic value for detecting early spondylodiscitis. After 2 weeks both techniques perform similarly.

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