JOURNAL ARTICLE
MULTICENTER STUDY

Triglyceride Levels and Fracture Risk in Midlife Women: Study of Women's Health Across the Nation (SWAN)

Po-Yin Chang, Ellen B Gold, Jane A Cauley, Wesley O Johnson, Carrie Karvonen-Gutierrez, Elizabeth A Jackson, Kristine M Ruppert, Jennifer S Lee
Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism 2016, 101 (9): 3297-305
27294327

CONTEXT: Unfavorable lipid levels contribute to cardiovascular disease and may also harm bone health.

OBJECTIVE: Our objective was to investigate relationships between fasting plasma lipid levels and incident fracture in midlife women undergoing the menopausal transition.

DESIGN AND SETTING: This was a 13-year prospective, longitudinal study of multiethnic women in five US communities, with near-annual assessments.

PARTICIPANTS: At baseline, 2062 premenopausal or early perimenopausal women who had no history of fracture were included.

EXPOSURES: Fasting plasma total cholesterol, triglycerides (TG), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol at baseline and follow-up visits 1 and 3-7.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S): Incident nontraumatic fractures 1) 2 or more years after baseline, in relation to a single baseline level of lipids; and 2) 2-5 years later, in relation to time-varying lipid levels. Cox proportional hazards modelings estimated hazard ratios and 95% confidence interval (CI).

RESULTS: Among the lipids, TG levels changed the most, with median levels increased by 16% during follow-up. An increase of 50 mg/dl in baseline TG level was associated with a 1.1-fold increased hazards of fracture (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.11; 95% CI, 1.04-1.18). Women with baseline TG higher than 300 mg/dl had an adjusted 2.5-fold greater hazards for fractures (95% CI, 1.13-5.44) than women with baseline TG lower than 150 mg/dl. Time-varying analyses showed a comparable TG level-fracture risk relationship. Associations between total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, or high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels and fractures were not observed.

CONCLUSIONS: Midlife women with high fasting plasma TG had an increased risk of incident nontraumatic fracture. Secondary Abstract: Midlife women with fasting plasma triglyceride (TG) of at least 300 mg/dl had 2.5-fold greater hazards of fracture in 2 years later and onward, compared to those with TG below 150 mg/dl, in a multiethnic cohort. Time-varying analyses revealed comparable results.

Full Text Links

Find Full Text Links for this Article

Discussion

You are not logged in. Sign Up or Log In to join the discussion.

Related Papers

Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
27294327
×

Save your favorite articles in one place with a free QxMD account.

×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"